Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Tuesday Intro: The Age of Innocence

On a January evening of the early seventies, Christine Nilsson was singing in Faust at the Academy of Music in New York. 
Though there was already talk of the erection, in remote metropolitan distances "above the forties", of a new Opera House which should compete in costliness and splendor with those of the great European capitals, the world of fashion was still content to reassemble every winter in the shabby red and gold boxes of the sociable old Academy. Conservatives cherished it for being small and inconvenient, and thus keeping out the "new people" whom New York was beginning to dread and yet be drawn to; and the sentimental clung to it for its historic associations, and the musical for its excellent acoustics, always so problematic a quality in halls built for the hearing of music.
The Age of Innocence
by Edith Wharton

I've considered myself an Edith Wharton fan for years, but have somehow put off reading her masterpiece until now. The Age of Innocence, winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1921, has swept me away into the glamorous world of Old New York. I'm happy to be reading with Audrey and hope we can coordinate a visit to The Mount sometime this fall.

What do you think of the opening paragraphs? Would you keep reading?



Every Tuesday, Diane at Bibliophile by the Sea posts the opening paragraph (sometime two) of a book she decided to read based on the opening. Feel free to grab the banner and play along.

20 comments:

  1. This is one of those books I read years ago for a book group discussion, and I think I read all but the last 30 pages (same with Jane Eyre). What is wrong with me???! lol I need to go back and re-read and finish it.

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  2. This is one of my favorites. I reread it 4 years ago, could be time to read it again. Enjoy.

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  3. I have never read anything by Edith Wharton. This does sound good from the opening. I really need to give her a try.

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  4. I've never heard of this author, but I like that opening paragraph. I'd keep reading. Kelley at the road goes ever ever on

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  5. I haven't read this book, but think it would probably be a good one to read along with others. I hope you enjoy it.

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  6. I amy have to be a New Yorker to get into the book!

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  7. I love Wharton and have read almost everything she's written. Read this one twice and enjoyed it just as well the second time around. Time for a reread!

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  8. I adore this book! I've read it several times and find something differently beautiful each read. I have a dream to visit The Mount someday - I hope you make it (and take photos!)

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  9. Age of Innocence is a delicious book--rich, nuanced, and so poignant, I get melancholy just thinking about it.

    I love this opening--very apt for the story.

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  10. I have this on Sparky (Kindle), and now I have to move it up in the queue. Thanks for sharing...and for visiting my blog.

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  11. I need and want to read this one. I love the writing and have enjoyed Wharton previously -- enjoy JoAnn

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  12. I have yet to read this one but I will enjoy following your expeience. I know you enjoy visiting "the city" and it sounds like this historical look will enhance your visits there. Enjoy!

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  13. I loved how she 'choreographed' this scene at the opera - everyone looking at each other, moving from box to box - it's definitely a good introduction to what is going to come.

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  14. I haven't read this one but it's a great teaser!

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  15. I haven't read the novel either, although I've seen the movie -- and have fond memories of the ruckus the filming of it caused in my Park Slope neighborhood at the time when the crew wanted us all to take the air conditioners out of our windows during a heat wave so their shots would look realistic! I really should have put this on my Classics Club list. Ah well, the next 50 books :)

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  16. I haven't read it, but it's on my TBR Classics list.

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  17. I love Edith Wharton! Enjoy! Thanks for visiting my Tuesday post.

    Catherine @ Book Club Librarian

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  18. I would keep reading -- it's Wharton, after all!

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  19. You know I would - in fact I have a couple of times. But as I read it, I can see where it might put off some readers.

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